Site Under Reconstruction

1988

[7] Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) returns for more murderous mayhem in this entry directed by Renny Harlin (Die Hard 2, The Long Kiss Goodnight). First, he dispatches of the three remaining characters from The Dream Warriors, including returning character Kristen (Tuesday Knight, played by Patricia Arquette in the last film). But before Kristen dies, she passes on her supernatural gifts to a new girl, Alice …

[8] Bob Hoskins stars as a 1940s Hollywood detective who is reluctantly pulled into a murder investigation in which the prime suspect is a cartoon rabbit. Can he overcome his hatred of ‘toons’ and prove Roger Rabbit’s innocence? Or will the real culprit get away with much more than murder? Robert Zemeckis (Back to the Future, Romancing the Stone) directs this hybrid blend of animation …

[4] There really isn’t a compelling reason for those ghosts to continue haunting poor little Carol Anne (Heather O’Rourke). But if it were a stand-alone movie outside a famous franchise, Poltergeist III might not have been half bad. There’s inventive use of mirrors throughout the movie (it’s how the spirits travel this time around), and the aspect of a broken family trying to reforge itself …

[5] In the first film, Mick Dundee (Paul Hogan) was a fish out of water in New York. This time around, the action is transported largely to the Australian Outback, with Linda Kozlowski’s character being more of the fish. Unfortunately, this sequel is short on laughs and anti-climactic, but Hogan and Kozlowski are charming enough to make it worth a gander for those who enjoyed …

[7] It’s rare, but here we have a remake that is better than the original. Kevin Dillon stars as a high school boy trying to warn his community that a blobular alien is devouring everyone in its sight. There are a few corny moments I could have done without (the motorcycle jump, for one), but Chuck Russell’s (Nightmare on Elm Street 3: The Dream Warriros) …

[3] Mel Gibson plays a drug dealer trying to come clean. Kurt Russell plays a cop assigned to bring Mel down. Trouble is, they’re kinda friends. And now they’re both sort of in love with the same woman, a restaurant owner played by Michelle Pfeiffer. All three leading actors are beautiful to look at, especially in Conrad Hall’s Oscar-nominated cinematography. But writer/director Robert Towne’s script …

[5] I thought I’d get a lot more from a dark comedy directed by Richard Donner (Superman, Lethal Weapon) and starring Bill Murray, but Scrooged is neither dark nor funny enough to leave much of a lasting impression. Murray plays a cutthroat TV executive named Frank Cross, the film’s equivalent to Ebenezer Scrooge, who makes life a living hell for everyone around him. Until of …

[3] Cocktail is everything awful about calculated ’80s studio film making. It’s as if Touchstone Pictures said, ‘Hey, we have Tom Cruise and a killer soundtrack — quick! Someone write a script!” And that script (based on a book by the screenwriter) throws in everything and the kitchen sink in a desperate attempt to recapture the success of Dirty Dancing, Top Gun, and An Officer …

[9] An off-duty police officer takes it upon himself to stop a gang of German terrorists who take an office Christmas party hostage in John McTiernan’s iconic action film, Die Hard. Let me put it another way: Die Hard is The Action Movie. It built a new paradigm for the genre and launched a movie star’s career. Bruce Willis can’t be given enough credit here. He …

[9] As far as monster movies go, this is the one to beat. It’s the only film directed by the late Stan Winston, the special effects wizard who brought so many creatures and otherworldly characters to life in movies like Jurassic Park, Terminator 2, and Edward Scissorhands.  I always wished he’d directed another movie, because Pumpkinhead is creepy as hell, a superb dark fairy tale …

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